Friday, January 31, 2014

DP: Enough information to kill a horse & refinement

Clarification has come with some information from the good ol' US government. According to studies from 2012 (and I can only assume this information will hold in 2013/14) Sportbike riders account for 60% of fatalities among motorcyclists. 
The original sport bike stunt rider.


This clarification has provided the need to refine my question to first working with Super Sport riders to find solutions that will decrease risk for themselves. With the up-coming interviews this weekend for more quantitative data with sport bike riders I hope to find what issues can effectively be tackled and what things need to be left to the age-old-darwinian-acid-test.

In addition to the qualitative interviews I'll be conducting soon I've started to sift through the mine of government analytical information on deaths, registration, gas prices, and everything else motorcycle related. This information will become (for my own use and possibly display) infographics that will help inform my questions for the interviews and also reaction once the research phase is dying down.


General plan (to be expanded upon soon.)

KC Stunt groups/ MCs
KC Most Wanted
Team Clutch
KC Plaza Sportbikes


Sources of research

http://www.iihs.org/iihs/news/desktopnews/popularity-of-high-performance-motorcycles-helps-push-rider-deaths-to-near-record-high

http://www.startseeingmotorcycles.org

http://www.mrp.siu.edu

http://www.harley-davidson.com/en_US/Content/Pages/learn-to-ride/learn-to-ride.html

http://www.ironhorsetaming.com/index.htm

http://blog.lib.umn.edu/olso1784/motorcycle/

http://mmsp.org/new/

http://www.mrfae.org
motorcycle activists

http://cyrilhuzeblog.com/2010/06/24/death-of-bill-sputnik-strain-one-of-the-greatest-motorcycle-rights-activists/

http://exchange.aaa.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Motorcycle-Fatalities-by-State.pdf
motorcycle deaths by year and state

SX: Inspiration for methods of making

Steven Holl:







Mc Bride Charles Ryan:

 
 



(More to come soon.)


DP: Wireframes for Process Book










Thursday, January 30, 2014

SX: The Mounment Inspiration & Figure

Aryton Senna is a figure that doesn't need an intro. For any fan of F1 (an open-wheeled car racing series that has been going for well over a century) Senna is a racer who marked the hay-day of F1, where driver aids were beaten by sheer skill. Senna, as per the requirement of most monument, has unfortunately been deceased.



Senna was a cultural icon. Hailing from Brazil he represented the country and brought pride when the nation was struggling, becoming a beacon for hope and a leader among the people.


After his 41 first place finishes, 80 podiums, and 65 pole positions Senna had many Grand Prixs and titles under his belt Senna passed away during a race at Imola on May 1st 1994 (Here's the onboard footage.)



The monument to Senna is currently a rather standard fair that doesn't capture the speed, heat, and essence of racing. This ambiguous version of Senna is something that you'd imagine as a tribute to someone as peaceful and sheltered as an intellectual. The new experience of the Senna memorial should be something that captures the experiences that drive racers to the sport that they would willingly die for.


Inspiration/boards








Wednesday, January 29, 2014

DP: Question

How can a design system aim to engage members of the road-going public but more specifically the motorcycling sector as a base for the group? How can this system connect the private institutions, state-based programs, and rider-based clubs that bikers utilize to build awareness to protect motorcyclists from people who don’t ride and themselves?


This would be done by initially accessing local riders that are known to the designer, as well as seasoned riders from the KC community, shops, and advocates to find a solution that would bring awareness to the fact that people in KC don’t understand the danger of the manner in which they drive around bikers.

Monday, January 27, 2014

Pro Practice: Week 1 Post

Firms I'd Like to Work at

DDL: Since I got a gig poster from them when I was in high school I respected their style. With their recent involvement in boutique-range branding I think this would be an interesting group to work with.



Boxing Clever: Since I really enjoyed the culture when I interned over here I'd love to return. Theres loads of upsides to BC; the size is right, the clients are cool, and the people are nice.





Toky: This is the one of the few agencies in STL that everyone wants to work at. Their client list is attractive (Contemporary art museum among others) and their work is respected. Toky seems to be a springboard for people to get other awesome jobs.



Firebelly: What's more attractive than non-for-profit work that doesn't suck? I love their philosophy.


WK: Sometimes traditional advertising spaces attract me (sacrilegious, I know.) Wieden Kenedy also has Royal Enfield on their client list (rad.)



Atomic Dust: The purveyors of AIGA/design culture in the STL area I've always enjoyed their get togethers (Kegs with Legs, gig poster events, shows.) The culture is strong with this one.




"What Advice Would You Give to a Graphic Design Student?"

The way that Chimero spins ordinary occurrences into tales that seem to captivate the imagination are truly inspiring. In his post, “What Advice Would You Give a Graphic Design Student?” Frank gives the soulful guide to living and working in the most fulfilling way he knows how. For me, something that I think is long overdue is to remember the designer. 
Design doesn’t have to sell. Although that’s usually its job.

With that idea in mind, communication feels much more free. When Chimero reminds us to stop trying to be cool, to ignore and accept all of the advice we receive, and to embrace ideas rather than trends. Everything he says seems to speak to a core that every creative person feels but can’t completely articulate with words. 

In short, I think that the words can be summarized by reevaluating your life and your work every day, taking nothing for granted.


Some of the best moments in Frank’s essay (in my eyes) are as follows:

Most important things happen at a table. Food, friends, discussion, ideas, work, peace talks, and war plans.
Everything is interesting to someone. That thing that you think is bad is probably just not for you.
Take things away until you cry. Accept most things, and reject most of your initial ideas.

Goals (Short term/Long term)

Short Term
Get hired at a firm I like, establish independence, pay school debts off (or at least start to)
I really don't know the specifics of where I'd like to go despite having some things started in Saint Louis there are other places I'd like to explore (chicago, and the coasts primarily.) So I guess all I can really say is that I'd like to start professionally practicing design.


Long Term

It's hard to think in the long term for me personally but, goal wise, I'd like to hop around gathering experiences from different cultures and firms. I think that after spending some time gathering more professional skills coming back to the area that I'm from and working with people who I find to be extremely talented would be rewarding (agencies such as Rodgers Townsend, Atomic dust, and collaborating with past mentors like Sleepy Kitty.)